shadowkat: (rainbow strength)
[personal profile] shadowkat
1. A rather funny book review, particularly comments section on Smartbitches -- the reviewer can't remember the names of the characters. I laughed, because this happens to me a lot. It's true of the romance genre, unfortunately, the books sort of blend or blur together. Only a few stand out.

Here's one of the comments that reminded me of conversations I've had with my mother about this:


Everything I’ve read blends together into one big mush. When I pick up my Nook after an hour away, I play a little game where I ask myself, “What title am I reading? Who is the author? Who are the characters and what is going on in the book?” I’m lucky if I can remember any of these even for the most compelling books. I guess my brain is just full.


My mother and I will tell each other about a book we're reading, but when one of us asks the title or the author, the other one has no idea and has to hunt it down. We're lucky if we can remember the characters names.

I've noticed books, movies and television series have this in common...they are only memorable if they really strike a chord in me somewhere. I either have to hate it, find it weirdly different, or adore it to pieces. It does of course help if I've seen it in more than one medium.

Does not help, if the books or series are similar. (ie. all superhero shows, or all romance novels about Dukes).

2. Apparently Star Trek Discovery is doing it's first openly gay romance or gay character romance on a Star Trek ship, portrayed by gay actors, both of which performed in Rent on Broadway. I think the US media has decided to join forces and through counter-programming kick homophobic butt. Fox has chosen to do a live musical version of "Rent". And now, Star Trek Discovery on CBS All Access is doing the first gay couple portrayed by actual gay actors on Star Trek.

3. Sesame Street makes fun of 1980s pop songs. LMAO. Can you guess what songs they are doing?

Sesame Street satirizes 1980s pops songs.. )

4. Remember what I said above about our media and pop culture and artists..as if by mutual agreement standing up to the stick in the mud bigots? Well...here's James Corden's, the new host of Late Night, response to the Doofus's latest. (By the way, I'm not sure if his latest will be upheld by the courts or not.)

5. Hmmm... Smart Bitches Lists Several Virigin Hero Recommendations.. -- What is a Virgin Hero? A romance novel in which the male hero or male romantic lead is the virgin in the story or a virgin in the story.

Smart Bitches also conned me into buying another book on sale for $2.99 -- entitled The Secret History of the Pink Carnation, which was the reality or inspiration behind the Scarlett Pimpernel.
It's a historical, contemporary, mystery, romance novel all in one. Yippe..Kai..Ay?

6. Stephen Colbert and Trevor Noah Try to Explain What is Happening with ACA in the US Senate or rather what they are trying to do with the Health Care Bill

What we have is three-four factions.
Read more... )

Poetry Meme

Jul. 27th, 2017 10:27 pm
lost_spook: (writing)
[personal profile] lost_spook
I don't seem to have been writing much lately, so I did what I usually do in these circumstances: the poetry meme!

1: Pick five fandoms. List them in alphabetical order.

2: Visit this site to find your first RANDOM POEM OF POWER. Write down the 5th line (yes, even if it's an E.E. Cummings poem and you wind up with an apostrophe). Repeat five times and - you guessed it - list 'em in alphabetical order! (No cheating, mind! This is a challenge and it's always been about creativity.)

3: I think you can see where this is going. Write a very quick 50-word half-drabble for each fandom (try to do it all in one sitting - make your brain explode!), using the line from the poem as a prompt. You don't have to include it in the half-drabble - it's just inspiration.

4: Bravo! Have a cookie.


*noms virtual cookie*

(These are all only 50 words, so I don't think they're really spoilery unless you know stuff already, they're just probably incomprehensible, but possibly for DW S10, Ripper Street S5 and Spooks S10. Ish. I did cheat, because I didn't want a comma, but at least I managed alphabetical order, and my brain also did not explode.)

Results under here: B7, Department S, Doctor Who, Ripper Street, Spooks )

Philip Kerr: Bernie Gunther Series

Jul. 27th, 2017 05:29 pm
selenak: (Watchmen by Groaty)
[personal profile] selenak
Reading the first Bernie Gunther novel has sent me into the rabbit hole, the marathon reading from which I now slowly emerge, having grabbed all the novels my local library had available and then buying the most recent one, Prussian Blue. By which you can conclude that these novels are addictive, despite or maybe because of their very dark setting and the way Kerr handles it. I didn’t always read them in order, but that works out better than usual in a series because Kerr writes them not always in linear order as well, and several take place in different eras simultaneously (one post WWII, one during the Third Reich), each filling out different gaps in his anti hero’s life. In fact, I’m glad I read, not by intention but coincidence of availability, “The Other Side of Silence” (No.11, probably the one most located in the 1950s, with just one flashback to the 1940s) before “The Pale Criminal” (No.2, set in 1938), because while both novels feature male gay characters, the ones in No.11 are fleshed out and for the most part sympathetic, and also not just one or two but four on page and a fifth one intensely talked about, whereas in No.2 they are solely a weak coward and a villain respectively, which for a novel set during a time when gay people ended up in prison and/or camps in Germany is a highly questionable authorial choice.

(Sidenote: not that you don’t have historical basis for writing gay villains in a story set among the Nazis. I mean, Ernst Röhm. But still.)

Reading the first novel had left me wondering how Kerr would justify Bernie Gunther’s continued survival as a (mostly) ethical P.I. in one of the most brutal dictatorships in history. Turns out, he doesn’t; Bernie gets drafted back into police service by Reinhard Heydrich in 1938, which means that when WWII starts, he along with the rest of the police gets absorbed into the SS, and while he manages to get a transfer into another unit, this doesn’t happen before being exposed to and in one case participating in mass shootings. While some of the novels feature flashbacks to the P.I. period, most therefore have Bernie as part of the institutions he abhors, which simultaneously deepens his moral compromise (and self loathing) but heightens the likelihood of his survival (while also providing the novelist with excuses for letting Bernie be present at some key points he couldn’t have been as a civilian, like the discovery of the Katyn massacre, more about that in a moment). I find this a fair authorial choice – if you’re going to produce a series of novels with a German detective set mostly in the Third Reich, keeping him entirely guilt free of the morass the nation was sunk into would have felt like cheating. I also was able to buy into the premise of various upper hierarchy Nazis – Heydrich, Goebbels, Arthur Nebe – finding Bernie so useful they would want to use him because he’s That Good at crime solving and occasionally even in a dictatorship you need to figure out who actually did the deed as opposed to finding the most convenient scapegoat. (The constant in fighting and rivalry between top Nazis also plays a role in Bernie’s survival, since a good detective is also useful for getting dirt on each other.) Another way Kerr plays fair is having Bernie constantly aware of the sheer insanity of it all – trying to track down individual criminals when the entire system around you has become criminal, and murder and thievery actually are the law.

Further ramblings below the cut )
emeraldarrows: The X-Files - Mulder kissing Scully on the forehead with text "Mulder/Scully" (2)
[personal profile] emeraldarrows
Next on my reading list was Timekeeper by Tara Sim, which caught my eye with it's offbeat plot. And it turned out to be an absolute delight.



Summary on the back: In an alternate Victorian world controlled by clock towers, a damaged clock can fracture time - and a destroyed one can stop it completely. It's a truth that seventeen-year-old clock mechanic Danny Hart knows all too well; his father has been trapped in a Stopped town east of London for three years. Though Danny is a prodigy who can repair not only clockwork, but the very fabric of time, his fixation with staging a rescue is quickly becoming a concern to his superiors. And so they assign him to Enfield, a town where the tower seems to be forever plagued with problems. Danny's new apprentice both annoys and intrigues him, and though the boy is eager to work, he maintains a secretive distance. Danny soon discovers why: he is the tower's clock spirit, a mythical being that oversees Enfield's time. Though the boys are drawn together by their loneliness, Danny knows falling in love with a clock spirit is forbidden, and means risking everything he's fought to achieve. But when a series of bombings at nearby towers threaten to Stop more cities, Danny must race to prevent Enfield from becoming the next target or he'll not only lose his father, but the boy he loves, forever.

My thoughts: I adored this book. From it's fabulous steampunk twist on history, to it's completely creative world-building, everything was complete perfection. The writing style was gorgeous, and I loved the entire creepy concept of time stopping an entire town, trapping the people inside. The concept of clock spirits was highly unique and fascinating - I wanted to know so much more about them! - and the historical details felt perfectly accurate, despite the interwoven fantasy elements. I enjoyed most of the background characters, and there were so many lovely scenes and moments, as well as an enjoyable ending.

Danny was a likable, thankfully non-annoying protagonist - I really enjoyed the concept of the mechanics in general, and it was such a delight to have a central character who wasn't the over-used savior type, but rather just an ordinary boy doing the best he can, and struggling to come to terms with the loss of his father and his mother's grief over it. Colton was instantly lovable, with his poignant loneliness and observations of the humans he watches over, and yet believably other-worldly. I loved the concept of him being connected to time - his little cog that he holds when he's sick was adorably sad - and their romance was sugary sweet and exactly what I'd hoped for. The whole plot had a funny, comforting feel, like an old children's novel, something I've never come across in a modern book, and loved.

I had no complaints whatsoever with Timekeeper and loved it wholeheartedly.

Books Meme + Update

Jul. 26th, 2017 04:35 pm
wendelah1: Fox Mulder reading (reading is fundamental)
[personal profile] wendelah1
Tomorrow my husband has an appointment to see someone who isn't his doctor because his doctor is on vacation. He's feeling worse rather than better. Maybe he needs a different antibiotic. We'll see.

I'm tired and distracted. I'm thinking about defaulting on my kidlit exchange. I can't focus on writing.

~/~/~

Books I finished:

Jane's Warlord by Angela Knight. This is yet another time-travel romance. The time-travel plot is silly but when isn't it? The serial killer plot is even worse but that's not why you're reading this book. The romance is standard fare. Warrior Boy from the future travels back in time to save newspaper girl, they have the best sex like ever, and girl returns with boy to his own time (and planet--did I mention he's not from Earth?) and they live happily ever after. She gets to take her cat, too. Luckily, the universe doesn't break from the strain. If you like your heroes to be hyper-masculine, super-human sex machines and enjoy sex scenes featuring bondage without safe-words between total strangers, this might be just what you're looking for. How do I even rate something like this? One star because it was a quick read, especially since I skimmed the sex scenes.

Time and Again by Jack Finney. It's an illustrated novel from 1970. Spoilers ) I thought the premise of the book was intriguing enough to keep reading but the execution left something to be desired. I solved the big mystery at the center of the novel by the end of the paragraph in which it was introduced. The romance fell flat. The ending was a complete dud. The style was serviceable Two lukewarm stars.

Books I abandoned:

The Man in the High Castle by Philip K. Dick. I checked this out because of the Amazon series, which I can't watch. A consolation prize? I know it's a classic but dammit, the book is boring. I didn't care about the characters. The plot seemed inconsequential, which given the premise, is pathetic. Maybe the series is better written. Anyway, after 67 pages, I'm done with it.

The Peppered Moth by Margaret Drabble. You should know that I have read and enjoyed a number of Drabble's books. This was not one of them. It was about genetics and the English class system. I didn't get through an entire chapter of this turkey. Books about unpleasant characters leading unpleasant lives need a hook and she didn't provide one.

Books in the pipeline:

The third and final book in the kid-lit series I'm reviewing for my kid-lit book exchange. Title withheld.

Classic Children's Television Shows.

Jul. 26th, 2017 10:08 pm
shadowkat: (Default)
[personal profile] shadowkat
Why is it I'm wide awake and raring to go, now, but want to sleep between 6 -10 am, and 1-3PM?

Sinuses are bugging me a bit. I feel like I have a catch in my chest or some congestion. Probably combination of allergies and chemicals (paint and pesticides ie. Raid).

Off and on over the past few years, I've been discussing children's television programming with Doctor Who fans. Who keep telling me that Doctor Who is a treasured British children's series, and they didn't have much children's programming.

Culture shock. Television more so than movies depicts some of the cultural differences between our countries. For one thing when I visited France in the 1980s, I was surprised to see US series in French, same with Australia (they had US television shows, but not the new ones, reruns from five years ago). As did Wales and Britain. Actually, I found watching television during the summer in England and Wales to be a painful experience in the 1980s...not that I had reason to do it that often. Did see a lot of Fawlty Towers.

Anywho...I thought I'd skip down memory lane in regards to kids shows.

In the 1970s, I watched the following television shows as a child, near as I can remember. And my brother and I loved Saturday morning cartoons. We'd eagerly await the new cartoons...which premiered the third Saturday in September. They were on from 7 am to roughly 12 noon, on all the networks. We only had four networks and UHF back then. Prior to showing up on Saturday morning, the networks would air a preview of the upcoming series as a sort of advertisement on the Friday night before. So you could plan which ones to check out.

* Hong Kong Phooey -- sort of a take on Superman and Mighty Mouse. Except with a mild-mannered dog.
So imagine cartoon dogs playing all the roles in Superman.

* Sid and Marty Krofft's HR PufnStuf (aired from 1969 - 1971). I loved this show, but only vaguely remember it. (I was born in '67). A young boy named Jimmy has in his possession a magic flute named Freddie that can talk and play tunes on its own. One day he gets on a magic talking boat that promises to take him on an adventure. The boat happens to belong to a wicked witch named Witchiepoo, who uses the boat to kidnap Jimmy and take him to her home base on Living Island, where she hopes to steal Freddie for her own selfish needs. Fortunately Jimmy is rescued by the island's mayor, a six foot dragon named H.R. Pufnstuf, and his two deputies, Kling and Klang. Then his adventures begin as he attempts to get back home.

* Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids -- hosted by Bill Cosby (this was in the 1970s, when Cosby was still a cool guy, before all the allegations came out against him. And before you say anything about Cosby, keep in mind the same allegations came out about Trump -- actually they were worse, and people elected him President. Lando wouldn't let me hear the end of it. He's not wrong, we are a racist society. Sexist and racist. Just not bloody sure what I can do about it.) The show however was pretty good -- it was about a bunch of black kids in the inner city learning how to help each other and stand up to bullying and racism.

* Battle of the Planets (1978) - adored this cartoon

* The Muppet Show -- basically a light children's satire on variety shows and various cultural and political issues of the time, starring the Muppets.

* School House Rock - 1973 - 2009 (Schoolhouse Rock! is an American interstitial programming series of animated musical educational short films (and later, videos) that aired during the Saturday morning children's programming on the U.S. television network ABC. The topics covered included grammar, science, economics, history, mathematics, and civics.) -- this was the result of the Children's Television Act of 1969, which was updated in 1996.

* The Secret Lives of Waldo Kitty (which was an illegal adaptation of the Secret Lives of Walter Mitty starring cats and dogs...and got into trouble with James Thurber's estate, for well doing it without permission)

* Sesame Street (1969)

* The Brady Bunch (1960s, early 70s, mostly in reruns)

* The Monkeeys (1966 show, in reruns in the 70s)

* Batman (1966 -- in reruns in the 70s)

* The Addams Family

* The Archie Show (1968) -- became Archie Funnies in 1970s

* The Flintstones...

* The Jetsons

* Lost in Space - 1965 (A space colony family struggles to survive when a spy/accidental stowaway throws their ship hopelessly off course. This is basically the American version of Doctor Who.)

* The Pink Panther (1969) -- a cartoon based on the Blake Edwards films, except without the adult content.

* Tom & Jerry

* The Bugs Bunny and Road Runner Show

* The Hannah Barbara Hour

* Sid & Marty Krofft Super Show

* Free to be You and Me

* ABC Afterschool Specials

* Reading Rainbow

* Kimba - the White Lion (basically the story that Disney co-opted for The Lion King, except he didn't grow up and we just followed Kimba's adventures as he eluded his evil uncle, Scar.)

I googled and UK had kids shows.

See here: Classic Kids TV Shown in the UK in the 70s and 80s

We actually had some cross-over. But Tarzan the cartoon never to my knowledge aired in the US, nor did Book Tower, we had Reading Rainbow instead.
feliciacraft: felicia as editor of the Sunnydale Herald (herald editor)
[personal profile] feliciacraft posting in [community profile] su_herald
[Drabbles & Short Fiction] [Chaptered Fiction] [Images, Audio & Video] [Reviews & Recaps] [Recs] [Community Announcements] [Fandom Discussions] [Articles, Interviews, and Other News]

Wed Reading Meme

Jul. 26th, 2017 09:12 pm
shadowkat: (work/reading)
[personal profile] shadowkat
1. What I just finished reading...

Lord of the Fading Lands by CL Wilson -- this is an "epic romantic fantasy series" that sort of clobbers you with fairy tale and romance novel cliches. And spends fare too much time on setting things up, and not enough on character. Also it's extremely repetitious. By the halfway mark, I was slugging my way through it. Do not recommend.

Not sure I'll bother reading the sequel, even though I do own it. Unfortunately, I bought it before I realized I didn't like the writer's style.

Eh, for a more in depth review, here's what I wrote on Good Reads:

Read more... )


2. What I'm reading now?

Americanah by by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie - which is about two Nigerian former lovers. One, female, Ifelemu, who moves to America for two years, and then decides to return to Nigeria. The other , male, Obinz, who went to seek his forturn in Great Britain, and has returned to Nigeria, gotten married and has a daughter.

I'm currently in the section in which each is relating their past or what came before. How they lived in Nigeria, going to University there and school, and their families. Obinze's mother is a University Professor. And Ifelemu's mother is an administrator, while her father had a government job before he was summarily fired, for not calling his boss, Mummy.

The woman are exceedingly strong in this book. More so than the men. Which is interesting.

It's not a romance (Obinze is unhappily married), more a literary coming of age tale about what it is like being Nigerian in this world.

The British, Americans and the Northern Europeans, basically the entitled white people who attempted to colonize and raid Africa, do not come across well. I hate to say this but if you go around colonizing other countries, thrusting your imperialistic might, and enslaving or undermining their inhabitants...you are bound to be portrayed by the inhabitants of those countries as irredeemable entitled assholes many years later. *cough*Karma*cough*

It's a fascinating novel, but somewhat depressing. So not sure how long I'll be able to stick with it. It's over 600 pages. And small type in a paperback. My aging eyes prefer ebooks, where I can increase the print size. Otherwise I have to wear reading glasses over the contacts. Like I'm doing now as I'm typing this.

Compelling yes. Uplifting and funny, no.

I don't know why literary novels, for the most part, are so depressing. There are a few funny ones here and there. But most are these poetic dirges of middle-class malaise. Either bad marriages, unsatisfying romances gone sour, bad friendships, dysfunctional families, etc.

Almost as if the only way you can be considered worthy by the esteemed academic literary canon is if you are depressing. (Well as long as you do it poetically at any rate.) I actually saw people condemn a novel for having a happy ending. As if a prerequisite for quality is well not ending happily.

I have no interest in writing depressing novels. It's not that I can't do so...I can. But seriously, why? Life is hard enough at it is.

Hmmm...on a poetic front, are there any witty poets wandering about?

(308) Avengers: Age of Ultron

Jul. 26th, 2017 10:14 pm
ebsolutely: (mcu [ pepperony)
[personal profile] ebsolutely posting in [community profile] fandom_icons
(308) The Avengers: Age of Ultron
→ Tony Stark, Natasha Romanoff, Steve Rogers, Bruce Banner, Clint Barton, Wanda Maximoff, Thor, Maria Hill

Previews;


OVER HERE at [community profile] megascopes
selenak: (BambergerReiter by Ningloreth)
[personal profile] selenak
Having now read three of the four books the first two seasons of The Last Kingdom are based on, I find my original suspicion that Bernard Cornwell novels benefit from adaptions into other media because these take you out of the main character's head justified, though not always quite in the way I assumed. Because the novels are narrated by an older Uthred looking back, his narrating self can sometimes point out things his younger self did not yet see or realise, for example, that he wronged his first wife Mildrith, or that he underestimated Alfred early on because a chronically sick non-warrior valueing learning and feeling guilty about sex could not possibly be a strong leader in his young eyes. Otoh, older, wiser Uthred narrating still doesn't change the fact most female characters come across as more dimensional and fleshed out in the tv adaption than they do in the novels (Brida and Mildrith in the first, Hild and Aelswith in the second season - Iseult, alas, is a cliché in both versions).

The tv show cut or compressed various characters and slimmed down events, and given that they do two books per season so far, that's not surprising. But even if they took a longer time, I think some of the changes and cuts were to the narrative's benefit. For example: Cornwell has to come up with some pretty convoluted circumstances and far-stretched plots to have a teenage Uthred who is still with the Danes secretly present when Prince (not yet King) Alfred confesses about his carnal lapses to Beocca. In the book, he needs to be because he's the narrator and neither Alfred nor Beocca would have told him about this. The tv show dispenses with said circumstances and just has the scene between Alfred and Beocca, without Uthred secretly listening in, because he doesn't need to be in order for the audience to get this information about the young Alfred.

Mind you, dispensing with the first two times Uthred meets Alfred and letting their first encounter not happen until after Ragnar the Elder's death creates one important difference between book and show relationship that's worth mentioning. Book Uthred lies to Alfred (and Beocca) these first two times and point blank spies on them for the Danes, so the later "why do you keep distrusting me?" indignation rings a little hollow in this regard. Show Uthred does no such thing, so Alfred is accordingly less justified in his lingering ambiguity.

Another cut that somewhat shifts perception: the first novel has Uthred participating in a few Danish raids led by Ragnar, including one on Aelswith's hometown (though she doesn't know he took part). Now, in the show we go from Uthred the child to adult Uthred directly and adult Uthred is solely seen at Ragnar's home, with the deaths of Ragnar & Co. impending, but given adult Uthred later is shown to be already a skilled fighter, it stands to reason he practiced these skills. But I suspect the show avoided showing Uthred fighting against Saxon civilians this early on deliberately. Both show and books have Uthred loving the Danes but staying with the Saxons post Ragnar's death because various circumstances (and then Alfred's machinations) make it impossible for him to do otherwise. Only the book, though, spells out that Uthred doesn't start to feel any kind of identification/emotional connection to the Saxons until he sees them winning a battle (until then, narrator Uthred says, he hadn't thought Danes could lose, which makes sense given that throughout Uthred's childhood and adolescence, they were winning), when before he regarded them as weak and didn't want to think of himself as belonging to them. Which makes sense given Uthred is raised in a warrior culture and is a young, arrogant adolescent at the time, but again, I suspect the tv version avoids spelling this out in order not to make him off putting early on when establishing the character.

Otoh, the scenes the tv show adds in the two seasons where Uthred isn't present all serve to flesh out the characters in question more and work to their benefit, whether it's Alfred, Hild, Aelswith or Beocca. The notable exception is Guthred in s2, whose additional scenes make him look worse, not better than the novel does. Possibly, too, because in the novel Guthred is described having an easy charm that makes Book!Uthred forgive him even the truly terrible thing Guthred does to Uthred, and the actor playing Guthred on the show doesn't have that at all, and instead comes across as nothing but fearful, easily influenced and weak. (And show!Uthred while coming to terms with him doesn't forgive him.) I have to say, lack of actorly charm aside, given that Guthred does something spoilery to Uthred ), I find the tv version more realistic.

The push-pull relationship between Uthred and Alfred is there in both versions, but in the tv show, it comes across as more central. As my local library has it, I also read "Death of Kings", the novel in which, Alfred dies, not without manipulating Uthred one last time into doing what he wants him to do, and Uthred's thoughts on the man later, summing him up, are Cornwell's prose at its best:

I stood beside Alfred's coffin and thought how life slipped by, and how, for nearly all my life, Alfred had been there like a great landmark. I had not liked him. I had struggled against him, despised him and admired him. I hated his religion and its cold disapproving gaze, its malevolence that cloaked itself in pretended kindness, and its allegiance to a god who would drain the joy from the world by naming it sin, but Alfred's religion had made him a good man and a good king.
And Alfred's joyless soul had proved a rock against which the Danes had broken themselves. Time and again they had attacked, and time and again Alfred had out-thought them, and Wessex grew ever stronger and richer and all that was because of Alfred. We think of kings as privileged men who rule over us and have the freedom to make, break and flaunt the law, but Alfred was never above the law he loved to make. He saw his life as a duty to his god and to the people of Wessex and I have never seen a better king, and I doubt my sons, grandson and their children's children will ever see a better one. I never liked him, but I have never stopped admiring him. He was my king and all that I now have I owe to him. The food that I eat, the hall where I live and the swords of my men, all started with Alfred, who hated me at times, loved me at times, and was generous with me. He was a gold-giver.


Last Yuletide I added a Last Kingdom request at the last minute because I'd seen it had been nominated, and accordingly it was short, but this Yuletide I think I'll also offer, and will request in more detail and more characters. While the other historical tv shows I consumed during the last year were entertaining in various degrees, this was the only one which was also good.

TV Bulletin Board

Jul. 26th, 2017 09:22 am
colls: (Default)
[personal profile] colls posting in [community profile] tv_talk
Active DW communities:
*[community profile] theamericans (The Americans)
*[community profile] tori_reviews (DC CW Shows)
[community profile] rocinante (The Expanse)
*[community profile] su_herald (Buffy/Angel - newsletter format)
[community profile] thelibrarians_tv (The Librarians)
*[community profile] xfilesficrecs (X-Files fic/fic recs)
*[community profile] who_at_50 (Doctor Who - 50th anniversary)
*[community profile] scifi_rewatch (Mutliple SFF shows)
*[community profile] sirpatrickstewartnews (TV actor Sir Patrick Stewart)
*[community profile] timeless_lifeboat (Timeless)
*[community profile] shadowhunterstv (Shadowhunters)
[community profile] neilgaiman (American Gods)
*[community profile] earth_final_conflict (Earth: Final Conflict)
*[community profile] killjoys_syfy (Killjoys)
*[community profile] twinpeaks (Twin Peaks)
(* indicates community has new content since last bulletin)
Any other TV comms around DW? Please let me know.

Keeping Track:
sidereel | tv guide | tv calendar (pogdesign) | episode calendar | my episodes | TV Time

Member's Corner:
[personal profile] shadowkat posted (NO SUBJECT)
[personal profile] darthfangirl posted DOCTOR WHO XMAS SPECIAL TRAILER THINGY
**********More member's posts are here
Have one that I didn't link? Feel free to leave it in the comments.

In our own house:
CRIME DRAMA AND POLICE PROCEDURALS

Suggestions and feedback welcome.

(no subject)

Jul. 25th, 2017 09:27 pm
shadowkat: (Default)
[personal profile] shadowkat
1. Apparently Stephen Moffat doesn't think there was any negative fan backlash regarding the announcement of the New Doctor Who, and everyone was happy with the idea.

LMAO. This made me laugh for fifteen minutes. If you want to know why, eh, go find the numerous posts in which I discussed said backlash.

It's interesting, on a side note, I'm reading Americanha and in that novel, the female protagonist describes her mother as an individual who refuses to see the world as it is, only as she wishes it to be. This article reminded me a bit of that.

There is of course something to be said for doing that...to focus on the positive and ignore all negativity. Unfortunately my brain isn't wired that way.


2. Daniel Craig is stuck playing James Bond for a fifth time, after saying he'd rather die than play the role because the character is so misogynistic

He's not wrong.

The books actually aren't misogynistic. I read the books. They aren't like the movies at all. Nor is the character anything like the movies. There's less gadgetry for one thing. The only film that reminded of the books was Doctor No and Casino Royale. Everything else, nope, not like the books.

The movies however...have become increasingly misogynistic and unsettling. (Having seen all them, except for Spectra, I can say that with some credibility. I don't believe in critiquing things I have not read or seen. Or tried to read or watch.) That doesn't mean I didn't enjoy the films. Yes, I've enjoyed insanely misogynistic and sexist fare in my lifetime. (Points at Westerns and Noir films and books). I have a tendency to ignore it, also I like strong male leads in things. But, I'm also critical of them. And I tend to see them as representative of certain aspects of our culture...

That said? After 25 Bond films...and counting...

Time to cast a female Bond.

Just saying.


3. Midnight Texas -- it's not True Blood. It's sort of like a weak, third rate cousin to True Blood. Co-worker liked it. And it's likable I guess...just, I'm used to better fare. This feels like a B horror movie.

It's about this hipster guy (beard, twenty-something, skinny, fluffy hair) who is a psychic. Most of it is fake, except of course for his ability to commune with the dead. And the ghosts appear as beaten up corpses. They are fussy, nasty, and attempt to possess him. Anyhow, since he apparently owes money to someone nasty, he flees Dallas for Midnight, Texas. His dead grandma told him he'd be safe there.

Midnight, Texas is inhabited by supernatural freaks. There's an energy vampire (the most interesting character in the series), a witch, a talking tabby cat (which I found sort of funky), a female assassin who has an interesting co-dependent relationship with the energy vampire, a seemingly normal waitress with an over protective Daddy, and ...a pawn shop owner, who appears to have a few secrets of his own.

Unlike True Blood, the writing is no better than the books, which is not a good thing. The dialogue sort of falls flat. And the acting is rather awkward and stiff, making me wonder about the direction.

It just doesn't have the production value that True Blood did or for that matter Supernatural and Vampire Diaries. Heck, Buffy's production value was better.

I may continue watching it to see if it gets better. But I can't help but wonder what my co-worker was smoking.

Then again, I may be overly picky. I've been watching better fare lately.
chasingdemons: (Editor)
[personal profile] chasingdemons posting in [community profile] su_herald
ANGEL: I know this is hard.
FAITH: You're a vampire.
SPIKE: Was. And as soon as I get this chip out of my head, I'll be a vampire again. But until then, I'm just as helpless as a kitten up a tree. So why don't you sod off?
FAITH: Okay.
SPIKE: Oh, fine! Throw it in my face! Spike's not a threat anymore, I'll turn my back! He can't hurt me.
FAITH: Spike? Spike. William the Bloody with a chip in his head. I kind of love this town.
SPIKE: You know why I really hate you, Summers?
FAITH: 'Cause I'm a stuck-up tight-ass with no sense of fun?
SPIKE: Well . . . Yeah, that covers a lot of it.

~~Who are You? (Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Season 4, Episode 16)~~




[Drabbles & Short Fiction]
[Chaptered Fiction]
[Images]
[Reviews/Recaps]
[Recs]
[Fandom Discussion]

FedEx: A Dramatic Tale

Jul. 25th, 2017 06:38 pm
settiai: (Blue Beetle/Booster Gold -- dreadable)
[personal profile] settiai
As I've mentioned in the past, I tend to have trouble whenever I pay FedEx extra for an evening delivery (between 5-8pm). Unfortunately, if I order anything that needs a signature, that's my only option as I'm not home to sign for packages earlier than 5pm. So requesting evening delivery is the only way for me to actually get what I order, since they won't deliver after 5pm unless you pay extra.

Cut to the last week of June. I ordered two packages that were scheduled to be delivered on Thursday, and I paid for evening delivery. As has happened several times in the past, the packages never showed up as being on the truck to be delivered. So around 7pm or so I called customer service and started a paper trail, as well as started livetweeting the whole story on Twitter.

FedEx managed to get in touch with the local facility, who told them the package was out for delivery. The driver just hadn't scanned it when he left. ("Uh-huh," I told the poor customer service rep with more than a little skepticism.) This gets a bit long, but it's honestly a rather amusing story. In retrospect, at least. It wasn't so amusing at the time. )

... and that's why I will never again order from any company that only offers FedEx as a shipping option.

Book Post: Ruby by Cynthia Bond

Jul. 25th, 2017 09:59 am
igrockspock: (book)
[personal profile] igrockspock
Ruby, the title character of the book, is a black woman who fled to New York City when she was young but ultimately comes home to a black township in East Texas. Adjusting to life in the South after the freedoms of the North is harder than Ruby realizes it will be, and the pressure of her barely suppressed childhood traumas quickly results in severe mental illness (or, to be more accurate, something modern readers will quickly recognize as mental illness, while the townsfolk mostly blame her for "not keeping herself under control"). Ruby herself believes that she is haunted. As a child, she witnessed terrible things happening to other children, and now the souls of those children flock to her for protection. Readers get the choice of how to interpret these "haints" -- as a symbolic representation of being trapped in a moment of trauma, or as literal ghosts that cling to Ruby's skirts. The situation comes to a head when Ephram, who loved her from afar as a child, sets himself as Ruby's protector amid fierce opposition from his ultra-religious sister.

This book contains serious triggers for rape and child abuse, both of which are referenced below the cut.

I need to discuss this book with somebody (spoilers) )
giandujakiss: (Default)
[personal profile] giandujakiss
Now is the time to call your Senators. Yes, certain GOP senators are particularly critical, but honestly, call yours no matter who you are or where you live. This is about protecting Medicaid, the general healthcare infrastructure in this country, and also denying Trump a win so that GOP feels more compelled to boot him out. On every level, GOP attempts to repeal ACA must be fought.

And yes, even if you called before - call again.

Fic Recs: 2x11 Excelsius Dei

Jul. 24th, 2017 09:21 am
wendelah1: Mulder sitting behind his desk hiding his face behind his hand (facepalm)
[personal profile] wendelah1 posting in [community profile] xfilesficrecs
This is the worst episode of the season so don't bother watching it, if you haven't already. I hate this piece of gossa more each time I see it. Not even my love for Teryl Rothery, who played Dr. Fraser on Stargate SG-1, can save this mess. NEVER AGAIN.

Mulder's dismissive attitude toward "ghost rape" might be understandable except when you consider that Agent Spooky believes in "ghost everything else," as the Monster of the Week writer points out in their instructional video: "Elderly Ghost Rape: Know Your Rights." You should check that episode out. It was a classic, even for MoW.

MULDER: I think this will turn out to be a huge waste of time just like all the other X-Files on entity rape. Unsubstantiated phenomena.

Honestly, does that sound like something Mulder would even say? Are there more stringent criteria that have to be met in order for ghost rape to be taken seriously and investigated, as opposed to other crimes committed by spectral phenomena?

SCULLY: But in a substantiated crime.

And a serious crime, which no one except Agent Scully is the least bit interested in investigating. Come on, Mulder. Unsubstantiated phenomena is the very definition of an X-File.

What else makes this the worst? How about creepy old people hopped on magic mushrooms. Cultural stereotyping. An apparent cure for Alzheimer's disease that no one seems interested in pursuing further. Exploding bathrooms. Angry ghosts. And finally, an ending where no coherent explanation, paranormal or otherwise, is even hinted at by the writer.

Oh, and for the record, registered nurses who work in nursing homes do not give bed baths, or change beds, or clean patient rooms. In service of this ridiculous plot, the character needed to be in a patient room alone, so she got assigned the duties that are done by the housekeeping staff. This is how it actually works: There is one RN on per shift; she is in charge of the rest of the staff; they do all of the bedside care; she does physical assessments and writes care plans; when needed, she calls the doctor for new orders.

If I were handing out grades, this episode would get an F minus.

Fanfic Recs

There is only one post-ep fic for "Excelsis Dei" at Gossamer. Luckily, it is a good one.

"Butterfly" by Oracle
Rated PG | 30K | Category SRA | Archived 04-12-31
Spoilers: Excelsius Dei
Keywords: Mulder/Scully romance. Alternate universe.
Summary: 'I can still see it, Mulder. Every detail was perfect, as though we'd never left that place.

Profile

frelling_tralk: (Default)
frelling_tralk

March 2017

S M T W T F S
   1234
567891011
12 131415161718
192021 22232425
26272829 3031 

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jul. 28th, 2017 04:37 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios